Manage Jet Airways Booking Small Company Marketing And Marketing Communications – Optimizing Planning And ROI In The Short Term

Starting any B2B or B2C business isn’t easy. While small and midsized enterprises account for over 95 percent of all businesses, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that only 50 percent of small businesses survive for more than four years.Why is that? We have observed three major factors that can be fatal:1. Managers often face too many “important” or “urgent” situations, and find themselves with too little time and skill to evaluate and execute the correct decisions;2. Even when they know what they want to do, businesses often lack the resources, including funding and appropriate staff, to act in the short, and often long term;3. Frequently, newer organizations lack the knowledge and expertise to profitably develop the marketing and marketing communications strategies, plans and executions necessary for their growth.Add to this the current explosion of digital marketing choices; for a beginning business, what used to be a fairly straightforward marketing process has turned into a complex web of choices. Limited resources also means increased importance on understanding and determining the return on investment (ROI) of your marketing dollars, much less how to improve it.A recent survey by Forrester Research found that sixty percent of buyers are now making their purchase decisions without interacting with a sales person, or even standing in front of the actual product. The implication for all organizations is that all marketing programs must be focused and crystal clear, and this is especially true for newer organizations.


Optimizing Marketing And Marketing Communications PlanningNavigating through today’s rapidly changing demographic, economic, technical and political landscape can be overwhelming for any company (or nonprofit, for that matter). Marketing strategies, plans and executions must be developed and executed with intelligence. And businesses must understand and have confidence in what results to expect.Most strategies, plans and executions aren’t perfect, no matter how solid you and your staff think your assumptions have been. Ask yourself, “Is here anything more that can be done to ensure the success of your program?”Actually, there is. Engage a marketing and marketing communications professional, for two to three months, to evaluate your plan and make recommendations on how to improve it before you commit your capital and other resources to it. Choose someone who has the ability to see the entire picture of your business, including customers, prospects, employees, competitors; someone who understands new and traditional media; and, someone who is passionate about improving your ROI.Does this sound like a lot of work, time and money which you can’t afford? Frankly, often you can’t afford not to take this step. An investment with the right professional should more than pay for itself, and should profitably improve sales in both the short and long term. Apolitical, fresh eyes and candor can go a long way toward improving ROI, and should also help you, your employees and other stake holders eliminate some of the stress about the future.What Exactly Will A Marketing Consultant Do?During this two to three month engagement (perhaps more, depending on the situation), a marketing professional will:1. Learn all aspects of your business, including interviews with your key constituents;2. Evaluate the existing marketing and marketing communications strategy (target audience, category, brand benefit/point of difference, reason to believe), plan, spending, and specific creative executions and media selection;3. Recommend specific changes to the overall program where necessary, and bring in other professionals if needed because of their specific areas of expertise;4. Provide a procedure for measuring and evaluating the new program and the objectives of the agreed upon plan. Benchmarking and on-going analysis are key elements of successful programs, allowing for change or refinement as you proceed;5. Inform and discuss the reasoning behind the completed plan so that the organization fully understands the rationale behind it.


The end goal of this outsourcing is to improve your ROI by using professional expertise and leadership to provide an integrated and holistic plan with meaningful tactical executions. And, importantly, doing so before committing time, money and resources to a new and lengthy plan. In other words, “Look Before You Leap.”Selecting A Marketing ConsultantIdeally, you should look for an established, media neutral B2B and B2C consultant, with brand experience across industries, companies and nonprofits, both large and small, who is willing to tell it like it is so candor will flourish. Don’t settle for a consultant with experience in only your niche or industry, or someone selling only one particular discipline. One size fits all often means nothing fits! And be sure your selection is analytically driven, and willing to test their recommendations in the real world.The often hectic, early years of your developing company may, in fact, be the perfect time to undertake a long range professional review of your business and opportunities, avoiding the dangerous practice of relying on “this is the way we’ve always done it” as a business plan.Hopefully, some of these thoughts will help, but as Mark Twain said, “The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”

Fear This My Fellow Athlete

Competition is good, just as fear is good – if you will use it to your advantage rather than letting it use you. Fear can frazzle us to make mistakes, become uncertain, and anxious, but fear used to our advantage can propel us to greatness. It’s a double-edged sword. Since fear is internal, you own it, it’s yours to use as you will, if you ignore it, it might hurt you, if you use it, it can help you, give you the edge, especially in competition. How might I know this?

Well, I supposed any seasoned competitor in the human endeavor or athlete understands exactly what I am saying, but in case you need more examples to help you better understand this concept, by all means keep reading.

Recently, I read an interesting article online and watched a great video sponsored by Expert Sports Performance, the video was titled: “How Talented Athletes Deal with Fear,” by Loren Fogelman, a well-known sports psychologist.

In my view I believe that Fear is a wonderful thing, a huge driver of the human psyche, but Loren Fogelman reminds me of the truth that: “it motivates some and stops others dead in their tracks,” which is absolutely a fact.

Still, I believe that if FEAR stops someone from achieving or causes them to choke under pressure, then I would submit to you that:

1.) They don’t understand what fear is; and,
2.) They are not using FEAR as an adrenal shot for peak performance

Well, I say; too bad for them, if they are competing against me or my team. Fear can be a weakness if you let it, or high-octane when you need it, YOU decide which. “It’s all in your head” I always say. Anyway, that’s the way I see it. A great book to read is: “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway!” published by in the 80s as a motivational type book.

As a competitive runner, I used to imagine footsteps behind me and ready to pass. Interestingly enough, I was a pretty good athlete so that didn’t happen much, but when it actually did happen it’s a sound you never forget. This imagination during competitive races propelled me to stay on pace or increase my speed opening up a large gap between me and the other runners. Sometimes when I am out training even today, I will listen to my feet hit the trail and pick up the sounds of the echo and amplify them in my brain to simulate those ever-feared footsteps, thus, propelling me to run faster and faster.